Public Amenities

Permit Counter Temporary Closures

To protect the health and safety of our staff and customers, and to help mitigate the impact of COVID-19, we closed our public-facing customer service counters on Monday, March 16, 2020. Our counters remain closed until further notice. This includes both the Street Use and the Traffic and Parking permit counters at the Seattle Municipal Tower on floors 23 and 37. We are still processing permit applications.

You can submit applications for all permit types online through the Seattle Services Portal.

Our staff will be available to provide application coaching and assist with issuing permits by phone or e-mail. Learn more about how on-street parking is being managed at this time.

Updated 9/8/21 

How do I get a permit for a public amenity?

This free, long-term permit allows permittees to install a public amenity in the public right-of-way (streets and sidewalks). Typical public amenities include neighborhood pole banners, signal box art, street murals, tables and chairs, benches, planters, and other street furniture.


Before you begin:

Check out the links below for more information about typical public amenities:  

Have a different idea for a public amenity? Please reach out to us at publicspace@seattle.gov and we'll provide coaching!


What documents will I need to apply? 


Check out the relevant permit page linked above for specific documents required!  

In general, we will need the following with your application: 

  • Site plan, including elevation, detail, and manufacturer's specifications as necessary 
  • Photo, design, or conceptual image 

Before your permit is issued, we'll also need: 

  • Historic/Landmark District Certificate of Approval (if in an historic district)  

Ready to apply?  


When you are ready to apply, head to the Seattle Services Portal by using the button to the right to login! Note: if you've never used the Portal before, you'll need to register and set up an account first. See this helpful article or video on how to do this. Once you are logged in, follow the steps below: 

  • Under "Create New" select "Permits-Street Use"  
  • Navigate to and select the "Long Term Use" and "Private Structures" record type   
  • When prompted to input "Use Code Description," choose "Public Amenity" 

Application Review & Decision 

  • You can check the status of your permit online through the Seattle Service Portal. We will review the application and may contact you either to request additional information or to request corrections.  
  • After our staff review is complete, we will either approve, approve with modifications, or (in rare cases) deny the application. 
  • This free long-term permit is renewed annually. If there are any changes you want to make, you can request changes through the Seattle Service Portal.  

Looking for funding? 

Funding may be available through the Seattle Department of Neighborhoods' Neighborhood Matching Fund or, if located in a neighborhood business district, through the Office of Economic Development's Only in Seattle Grants

  • The Neighborhood Matching Fund (NMF) at the Seattle Department of Neighborhoods provides funding opportunities for neighborhood improvement projects. For NMF projects, groups are required to donate volunteer time, materials, professional services, and/ or cash at 50% or more of the value of the funding request. The NMF Small Sparks fund is particularly suitable for street painting projects. Applications are considered as they are received on an ongoing basis throughout the year. We encourage community groups to go through this process to develop the required community approval and obtain the funds necessary for installation. begin the process in the fall or winter so that they are ready to paint their intersection the following summer.   
  • 4Culture provides funding and support for the cultural work that makes King County vibrant 
  • Urban Artworks provides opportunities for underserved youth and contemporary artists to create public works of art 
  • SEEDArts connects professional artists with developers and community groups to design, fabricate, and install artworks in public spaces